21 Great Examples of PowerPoint Presentation Design [+ Templates]

We can all agree there’s more than one way of doing something. For example, some people default to the “loop, swoop, and pull” method when they tie their shoes, while others swear by the “bunny ears” technique. Either way you swing it, your shoes get tied, right? The trouble is, in some areas of life, different approaches don’t always return the same results. When it comes to presentation design, for instance, there’s no shortage of avenues you can take. And while all that choice — colors, formats, visuals, fonts — can feel liberating, it’s important that you’re careful in your selection as not all design combinations add up to success. We’re not saying there’s one right way to design your next PowerPoint presentation, but we are saying that some designs make more sense than others. Luckily, new versions of PowerPoint actually suggest ideas for you based on the content you’re presenting. In this blog post, you’ll learn how to create an awesome PowerPoint deck and then see 21 real presentations that nail it in exactly[…]

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13 Great Landing Page Examples You'll Want to Copy in 2019

While many landing pages look different and use a variety of interesting strategies to pull in audiences, they all serve one major purpose. These pages get website visitors to convert to the next stage in the buyer’s journey. Rather than serving as a basic advertisement that shows a customer a product, a landing page aims to engage and delight a customer by offering them something that relates to the product or the company’s industry. When they fill out the form and receive a reward of interesting content, they might be even more likely to trust your brand and become a customer. Here’s a quick example. If a business wants to sell an AI product that helps salespeople, they might create a landing page that offers audiences a free video on how to use AI in the sales industry. Interested audiences might offer their contact information in exchange for the valuable information. If they enjoy the video they’ve received, they might be more likely to respond to or purchase a product from a company rep who[…]

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18 Examples of Successful Co-Branding Partnerships (And Why They're So Great)

Everyone has loyalties to their favorite brands, but there’s a good chance your favorite products are the result of two separate brands working together. One of my own beloved childhood memories was a product of co-branding: Betty Crocker partnered with Hershey’s to include chocolate syrup in its signature brownie recipe. There’s something brilliant about that co-branded product: It’s a fun way to marry two classic brands into one delicious experience for fans of baking and chocolate alike. In fact, these brands still create new co-branded products to this day. Co-branding is a strategic marketing and advertising partnership between two brands wherein the success of one brand brings success to its partner brand, too. Co-branding can be an effective way to build business, boost awareness, and break into new markets, and for a partnership to truly work, it has to be a win-win for all players in the game. Both audiences need to find value — like chocolate-loving fans of Betty Crocker and Hershey’s. There are a ton of great examples of co-branding partnerships out there.[…]

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Subheadings: What They Are & How to Craft Great Ones

If you’re in marketing, you know that headlines are important. But did you know that subheadings are just as important? Sure, the headline is responsible for capturing a visitor’s attention. But then what? To give you a better sense of how it all works, I’m not only going to explain what a subheading is, but I’ll also detail a process that you can follow to use them to inspire action.  Once you’re done reading this article, you’ll know exactly how to unleash a killer headline, subheading, and CTA combo that will make people see, want, and click on your site.  What is a subheading? First off, let me explain what I mean by subheading, which is also often called a subheadline. A subheading is text placed under a headline, often with a smaller font, which expands on what the headline says. For example, a headline could announce the launch of a new product and a subheading could give more specific details about the product’s features. Here’s a good definition from Wiktionary: A smaller, secondary headline[…]

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