How to Set Up a Facebook Shop: The Quickstart Guide for Beginners

You’ve got to be proactive.

If you want to be successful, you can’t sit back and wait for customers to come to you – reach out to them.

So where are they? Facebook.

Facebook is the largest social network in the world, with more than 1.09 billion people logging on daily to spend an average of 58.5 minutes on the platform.

That’s insane.

If you sell products online and you don’t have a Facebook shop, you’re missing a huge opportunity.

Plus, the Facebook shop feature isn’t just available to major retailers – anyone can get in on the action.

In this article, you’ll learn how to create a Facebook shop and how to integrate your Shopify store with Facebook. Plus, make sure that you stick around until the end to learn how to tag your products in Facebook posts.

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What Exactly is a Facebook Shop?

A Facebook shop is a tab which you can configure on your Facebook page to promote and sell your products directly to Facebook users on the platform itself.

Here’s an example of a Facebook store from Shopify user Best Self Co:

Facebook Shop Example

When Facebook users click on a product, they’ll be shown an expanded product page. On this page, they can see product pictures and videos, and read the product description.

Facebook Shop Product Page Example

What Are the Benefits of a Facebook Shop?

Before we look at how to create a Facebook shop, it’s important to understand exactly how a Facebook store can help you grow your ecommerce busines

Here are the three main benefits of having a Facebook store:

1. You Can Tag Your Products in Facebook Posts to Boost Sales

Once you have a Facebook shop set up, you’ll be able to start tagging any of your products featured in your images.

This ensures that everyone who views your posts will become aware of the products you have available.

In the example below from Nike, you can see product listing thumbnails under the heading “Products shown.”

Facebook Shop Product Tagging

Plus, notice how each product in the image has a price tag icon? When users hover their mouse over the icon, product information is displayed.

Here’s the best part: Once you’ve set up your Facebook shop, tagging products in posts is quick and easy.

More on that in a minute.

2. You Can Tap Into Facebook’s Social Engagement

People hang out on Facebook.

Remember, the average daily user spends nearly an hour on the platform every day.

By adding a Facebook shop tab to your page, you can capitalize on the way users engage on Facebook.

Unlike your website, when people view your products on your Facebook store, they can Like them, save them for later, share them with friends, or leave a comment asking a question or sharing their thoughts.

Social Selling

Each of these actions will help to expose your brand to new people in the best possible way – through a friend.

These engagements work as a powerful form of social proof – meaning that people are heavily influenced by the opinions and actions of others.

3. A Facebook Shop Can Help to Reduce Friction in the Sales Process

You want to make it as easy as possible for people to purchase your products.

The more hoops you make customers jump through, the more likely they’ll give up or get distracted and not complete their purchase.

Simply put, a Facebook store makes life easier for Facebook users.

They can browse your products in the same window they’re using to chat with friends. Plus, they can add products to their cart and then check out on the platform, or head to your website to finish purchasing your products.

The Problem with Facebook Shops in 2019

Unfortunately, the Facebook shop feature isn’t currently available in all countries. So, which countries can access the feature?

Good question – no idea.

Facebook isn’t super helpful in this regard, saying only, “This feature is being rolled out gradually and may not be available to you yet.”

Facebook Shop Roll Out

There’s really only one way to find out if you can access this feature: Try to create a Facebook shop and see if the option is there.

What’s more, even if you can access the Facebook shop tab feature, Facebook only provides a shopping cart and checkout service for sellers in the U.S.

And once again, we don’t know when other countries can expect access to this feature.

However, it’s not all bad news.

If you’re not based in the U.S., you can still use a Facebook store to hook in new customers and send them to your website to check out by using the call to action, “Check Out on Website.”

Check Out on Website

Okay, now let’s look at how to set up a Facebook store with Shopify. Then, we’ll take a look at how to create a standalone Facebook shop.

How to Set Up a Facebook Shop with Shopify

We recommend this route for serious sellers (and for existing Shopify or Oberlo users).

Why?

Firstly, you’re in control – your business won’t be completely dependent on the whims of future Facebook policies.

You’re also able to utilize Shopify’s powerful ecommerce management software.

#Win

Plus, Shopify allows you to integrate multiple sales channels.

This means that you can sell on your own website, Facebook, Messenger, Instagram, Amazon, eBay, and more, all from one dashboard.

In other words, it will make your life way easier.

Shopify Facebook Shop Integration

Okay, ready to get to work?

Step 1: Create Your Shopify Store

If you don’t already have a Shopify store, head to Shopify.com and create an account.

Shopify Sign Up

Thankfully, Shopify offers a free 14-day trial, so you can test it out before committing.

However, to create a Facebook shop, you’ll need to sign up to one of Shopify’s plans, which start at just $29 per month.

When you’re done, you’ll be taken to your new Shopify dashboard – A.K.A. the command center of your future ecommerce empire:

Shopify Dashboard

At this point, Shopify will prompt you to add a product, customize your theme, and add a domain name.

It’s best to get your store set up now – for more help, check out: How to Set Up Your Shopify Store.

Also, if you don’t already have a Facebook page for your business, you’ll need to set one up before we can continue. For help, read our guide, 19 Easy Steps to Setting Up a Killer Facebook Business Page.

Done? Awesome!

Step 2: Connect Your Shopify Store to Your Facebook Page

Head to your Shopify dashboard, click “Sales Channels,” and then click the plus icon to add Facebook as a new sales channel.

Add Facebook Shop to Shopify

Once you’ve done that, click “Connect Account” to connect Shopify with your Facebook account.

Connect Facebook and Shopify

Facebook will ask you to allow Shopify to “manage your Pages and publish as Pages you manage” – click “OK” to continue.

Next, use the drop-down menu to select the Facebook page that you want to create a Facebook shop for. Once you’ve done that, click “Connect Page.”

Connect Shopify to Facebook Page

At this point, you’re asked to read and agree to Facebook’s Seller’s Terms and Policies. Make sure to read these before clicking “Accept Terms.”

All done?

Okay, it can take up to 48 hours for Facebook to review and approve your store. In the meantime, let’s break down what you’ll do once you get the green light from Facebook.

Once Facebook has approved your store, you’ll need to sign up for one of Shopify’s plans and click “Enable” before you can start selling through your Facebook store.

Enable Facebook Shop

Step 3: Choose Which Products and Collections to Show on Facebook

Now that you’ve linked your Shopify store to your Facebook page, it’s time to set up your Facebook shop.

To add products to your Facebook store, click the “Products” tab in your Shopify dashboard and select the products you want to add.

Next, click “Actions” to open the action menu, and then click “Make products available.”

Shopify Product Management

A popup window will ask you which sales channels you want the products to be displayed on. Check the box next to Facebook and click “Make products available.”

Make Products Available on Facebook Shop

You can also add collections to your Facebook shop in the same way. Just click the “Collections” tab in the Shopify dashboard and repeat the process.

Now, to edit how products are arranged in your Facebook store, head to the “Publishing” tab under “Facebook” in the sidebar.

Here you can add, remove, and arrange collections of products shown in your Facebook shop.

Shopify Product Management

Once you’re done, head to your Facebook page and you’ll see a new “Shop” tab featuring your products and collections.

Here’s an example from Shopify user KKW Beauty:

Facebook Shop Tab

If you’d like to change the order of your Facebook page tabs, read “Step 1” of the next section.

Congratulations, you’re now the proud owner of a Facebook shop!

How to Set Up a Facebook Shop Without a Third-Party Service

In this section, we’ll work through how to set up and manage a Facebook store using only the platform itself.

Again, if you don’t yet have one, make sure to set up a Facebook business page before continuing.

Okay, let’s jump in.

Step 1: Add the “Shop” Tab

Navigate to your Facebook page and click “Settings.”

You’ll then be presented with a huge menu of Facebook page options. Now, click “Templates and tabs” so that we can add the Facebook shop tab.

Facebook Page Settings

This will show you all of the tabs you’re currently using. Scroll to the bottom of the list and click “Add a Tab.”

Facebook Shop Tab

Now, find “Shop” and click “Add Tab.”Add Facebook ShopThis will add the shop tab to your Facebook page.

If you’d like to rearrange the order of your tabs, just click the three horizontal lines and drag your tabs into your preferred arrangement.

Facebook Shop Tab

However, when doing this, make sure that your shop tab is in the top three. This will ensure that it’s still visible when your tab list is shortened by the “See more” link.

Facebook Shop Tab

Step 2: Configure Your Facebook Shop Tab

If your shop tab isn’t displaying correctly, head back to “Templates and tabs,” click on “Settings,” and make sure “Show Shop tab” is on.

Facebook Shop Tab

Once you’ve done this, head back to your Facebook page and click on “Shop.”

To continue, you must agree to Facebook’s Seller’s Terms and Policies. Make sure to read these through before agreeing and clicking “Continue.”

Set Up Facebook Shop

Next, Facebook will ask you how you’d like people to purchase products from your shop.

Anywhere outside of the U.S. has two options: “Message to buy,” or “Checkout on another website.”

Facebook Shop Checkout Method

If you live in the U.S. you’ll also be given the option to accept payments directly from your Facebook page by linking your bank or stripe account. (Click here to learn how to do this.)

Once you’ve chosen your shopping method, it’s time to add products to your Facebook shop!

Step 3: Add Products to Your Facebook Shop

To start, head to your Facebook shop tab and click “Add Product.”

Add Product to Facebook Shop

Next, upload your product photos and videos. Then, type in your product name, price, and include a compelling product description.

In this example, I opted to send buyers to a website to complete their purchase, so I would need to add the website’s URL for this specific product.

Facebook Shop Add Product

Now, Facebook has detailed guidelines and recommendations for product listings. Let’s take a quick look at some of the most important points.

Facebook Product Image Guidelines

You must:

  • Include at least one image for each product listing
  • The image must be of the product itself (it can’t be a graphical representation)

Ideally, you should use images that:

  • Show all of the product
  • Show the product up close in a well-lit setting
  • Have a resolution of 1024 x 1024 or higher
  • Are in the square format
  • Have a white background
  • Showcase the product in real-life situations

Don’t use images that contain:

  • Text (e.g., calls-to-action or promo codes)
  • Offensive content (e.g., nudity, explicit language, violence)
  • Advertising or promotional material
  • Watermarks
  • Time-sensitive information (e.g., limited time offers)
Facebook Product Description Guidelines

Your descriptions shouldn’t include:

  • HTML (Rich text only)
  • Phone numbers or email addresses
  • Long titles
  • Excessive punctuation
  • All the letters capitalized or in lower case
  • Book or film spoilers

Ideally, your descriptions should:

  • Only provide information directly related to the product
  • Be concise and easy to read
  • Highlight unique product features and benefits
  • Be grammatically correct and properly punctuated

When you finish, make sure to click the toggle to enable sharing and then click “Save.”

At this point, you’ll need to wait for Facebook to review and accept your product. This usually takes a few minutes and Facebook will notify you when processing is complete and your products are visible.

Once your product is approved it will look like this:

Facebook Shop Product Page

Then, simply repeat this process until all of your products are added.

Step 4: Manage Your Products and Orders

To manage your products and orders, click the “Publishing Tools” tab at the top of your Facebook page, and click “Shop” near the bottom of the sidebar menu.

Facebook Shop Management

If you’re based in the U.S. and opted to allow users to checkout on Facebook, you’ll get a notification each time you receive a new order.

You also have an addition tab under the “Shop” menu to manage your orders.

Next up:

How to Tag Your Products in Facebook Posts

Let’s quickly run through how to tag your products in Facebook posts.

First, share a new Facebook post or bring up an old post featuring products that you’d like to tag.

Now that you have a Facebook shop tab with products on it, there’ll be an option to “Tag products” next to the usual “Tag photo” button.

Tag Products Facebook Shop

Simply click “Tag Products,” select the product you’d like to tag and click “Finished Tagging.”

That’s it!

Now, whenever a user views your post, they’ll be shown thumbnails of your Facebook shop product listings alongside the image.

Facebook Shop Product Page

Summary

Facebook shops are an incredible opportunity to place your product offerings inside the most popular social media platform in the world.

Remember, with a Facebook shop you can:

  • Capitalize on Facebook’s incredible social engagement to expose your brand to friends of shoppers
  • Tag your products in Facebook posts to boost sales
  • Reduce friction in the sales process by allowing users to shop for your products without leaving the site

If you’re serious about selling online, it’s best to create a Facebook store using a service like Shopify.

This way, you’ll retain complete control over your business while also getting access to a suite of features designed solely to help you grow your bottom line.

If you’re based in a country without access to the Facebook shop feature, don’t worry – it’s on its way. And in the meantime, you can still take advantage of other Facebook features to grow your store, such as Facebook Stories and Facebook Live.

Do you have a Facebook store? Let us know about your experiences in the comments below!

Want to Learn More?

The Beginner’s Guide to 7 Types of Internet Marketing

The internet has taken over.

Check this out: People under the age of 34 spend about four hours online each day – on mobile devices alone.

Gen Z Internet Use

Today, the internet is used for pretty much everything – communication, learning, entertainment, shopping…

Plus, more and more people come online every day.

In fact, there are currently 4.05 billion Internet users worldwide – and this number is increasing every second.

This presents an unbelievable opportunity.

Marketers have always gone wherever they can connect with people in order to promote their products and services – and the internet is one hell of a place to do just that.

Never before could a single person reach so many people, in so many ways, instantaneously, with such ease.

Excited?

In this article, you’ll learn all about the seven types of internet marketing so you can start using them to achieve business success.

Fasten your seatbelt.

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What Is Internet Marketing?

Internet marketing (also known as online marketing, digital marketing, emarketing, or web marketing,) is an all-inclusive term used to describe marketing activities conducted online. For this reason, internet marketing encompasses a wide range of strategies and tactics, such as social media marketing, content marketing, pay-per-click, and search engine optimization.

The 7 Types of Internet Marketing

There are seven main types of internet marketing:

  1. Social media marketing
  2. Influencer marketing
  3. Affiliate marketing
  4. Email marketing
  5. Content marketing
  6. Search engine optimization (SEO)
  7. Paid advertising

Each of these seven types of internet marketing encompasses many different strategies and tactics. Plus, these types of internet marketing complement each other and are often used together.

Let’s explore the different types of internet marketing to understand how they work individually and together.

1. Social Media Marketing

Social media marketing is the process of acquiring attention and sales through the use of social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

Now, social media marketing can be split into two camps: organic (free) or paid.

Organic Social Media Marketing

Organic social media marketing focuses on building a community and deepening relationships with consumers in an effort to induce interest and customer loyalty.

There are countless ways to do this – let’s take a look at a few.

First, you can position your brand as an authority in your niche. An easy way to do this is to engage other people and contribute valuable insights to conversations.

Here’s an example from Oberlo’s Twitter account:

Oberlo Twitter Post

Another way to foster loyalty is to consistently prove how much you value your customers and community.

Oberlo Twitter Engagement

Another key aspect of social media marketing is harnessing the power of customer relations.

Immediately replying to customer queries on social media showcases your brand’s authenticity, and will inspire other people to trust your products or services.

Oberlo Twitter Response

What’s more, social media marketing is closely linked to content marketing (which we’ll cover next).

This is because social media platforms are the perfect place to promote valuable content to your community and niche – like this post we shared on Oberlo’s Facebook page:

Oberlo Facebook Ad

Okay but what about ads on social media?

There are tons of ways to use paid social media marketing to promote your business, and each platform has its own suite of paid promotional options.

Take Facebook.

You can pay to promote your existing organic posts or create a dedicated Facebook ad tailored to your marketing objectives.

Most paid social media marketing is also referred to as “pay-per-click” (which we’ll cover in more detail below).

To learn more, check out, How to Create a Killer Social Media Marketing Plan.

2. Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Search engine optimization – also known as SEO – is the process of optimizing websites and digital content to improve search engine rankings, which in turn, maximizes the number of visitors to a particular webpage.

In other words, say you wanted your office furniture website to appear at the top of Google’s search results whenever someone searches for “office furniture in London.” Well, the process you would use to make that happen is SEO.

It’s worth noting that today when we talk about SEO we’re almost exclusively referring to Google (unless you live in China and use the search engine Baidu).

Why?

Because Google is undoubtedly the most popular search engine in the world – eating up a huge 79.77% of market share.

Search Engines Compared

So how does SEO work?

Search engines use something called “crawler bots” to crawl the internet and build an index of the content available online.

Then, whenever someone searches a keyword, the search engine will try to provide the most useful and relevant results.

Now there are two sides to SEO: On-page and off-page.

What Is On-Page SEO?

On-page SEO is when you optimize your website or content to rank higher in search engines for targeted keywords or phrases.

Examples of on-page SEO include:

For this reason, SEO is closely related to content marketing – we’ll explore this more below.

What Is Off-Page SEO?

Off-page SEO is when you optimize your website or content to appear higher in the search results through methods outside of your website or content.

These include external signals like your social media presence and brand mentions.

However, the largest and most influential part of off-page SEO is the generation of backlinks. This is when other websites link to your website or content.

The reasoning behind backlinks is simple.

If lots of websites link to your website, then Google will assume you have valuable and relevant content.

Search engines also take into account the authority of the website that links to you. For example, one link from an authoritative website like the New York Times will be more effective than 100 links from unknown websites.

A great way to generate backlinks from authoritative websites is to produce high-quality content that other people will want to share.

Alternatively, you can create dedicated content for another website – this is called “guest posting.”

To learn more, check out, SEO Tutorial for Beginners: Where to Start?

3. Content Marketing

Content marketing is the process of consistently creating, distributing, and promoting relevant online materials in a way that’s strategically designed to attract, engage, and convert your target market into customers.

There are countless forms of content that businesses use to do this, such as:

  • Blog posts
  • Videos (that are often shared to social media platforms like Facebook and YouTube)
  • Industry reports and studies
  • Infographics summarizing reports and studies
  • Ebooks
  • Podcasts
  • Case studies
  • Emails
  • Webinars

This article that you’re reading is content marketing!

Content marketing works closely with many other types of internet marketing – especially social media marketing and SEO.

As we saw above, social media is one of the main channels used to distribute and promote content.

Now, let’s take a closer look at how content marketing relates to SEO.

Search engine optimized content is one of the best ways to get your brand higher in the search engine results pages (SERPs).

For example, I recently wrote a blog post titled, Instagram Story Dimensions and Killer Ideas to Up Your Game, and I used SEO best practices to optimize it for the keyword, “Instagram story dimensions.”

And currently, whenever someone searches that keyword on Google, my article is the top result:

SEO Example

Here’s the aim of the game:

Ideally, most people who search “Instagram story dimensions” will click on my article and derive plenty of value from it. Then, they may explore some of the other great content that Oberlo has to offer.

Hopefully, a large proportion of those visitors will sign up to our email list to hear about great new content.

And all the while, we’re leading them (you!) towards becoming Oberlo users.

It’s win-win.

Our readers get awesome free content to help them start and grow a business, and we get to be the platform that helps them do it.

The key to content marketing is all about giving before you get.

To learn more, check out, How to Use Content Marketing to Attract Customers.

4. Influencer Marketing

First thing’s first: What exactly is an influencer?

An influencer is someone with a relatively large online following, including:

  • Mainstream celebrities like Emma Watson.
  • Niche celebrities such as world chess champion Magnus Carlsen.
  • Industry experts and authorities, such as digital marketing expert Neil Patel.
  • Micro-influencers (those with less than 100,000 followers) like environmentalist Elizabeth Couse.

Okay, so what’s influencer marketing?

Influencer marketing is the process of working with influencers to promote a product or service to their online following.

Let’s look at an example from Vital Proteins.

This food supplement brand partners with influencers to reach their target audience of young, fashionable, health-conscious women.

Here, influencer Meredith Foster promotes Vital Proteins on her Instagram account:

Influencer Post

Before internet marketing, influencer marketing was only available to large brands who could afford to work with big-name celebrities.

But now, everyone can engage in influencer marketing.

In fact, Influence.co found that on average, micro-influencers with 2,000 to 100,000 followers charge between $137 and $258 per Instagram post.

Remember, that’s on average – meaning some might charge just $50, and plenty of others will happily promote your product in exchange for a free sample.

Alternatively, many businesses will opt to pay the influencer a cut of the sales they produce – this is called affiliate marketing (which we’ll cover in the next section).

Want to know the best part?

Micro-influencers actually perform better than big-name celebrities.

A survey conducted by Collective Bias found that just three percent of consumers are influenced by celebrity endorsements in their purchase decisions, while 30 percent of consumers are likely to buy a product recommended by a non-celebrity blogger.

To learn more, check out, How to Do Influencer Marketing.

5. Affiliate Marketing

Affiliate marketing is essentially just online referral marketing.

A business will set up a program that pays commissions to external websites or individuals for the traffic or sales they generate.

This allows internet marketers and influencers to earn money promoting another business’s products or services.

Let’s look at an example.

Website host and domain registrar Bluehost have a popular affiliate marketing program that allows influencers and internet marketers to make money by promoting their services.

The popular blog, The Minimalists, promote their Bluehost affiliate link in their articles.

Minimalists Affiliate Promotion

Each time one of their readers clicks the link and signs up, Bluehost give The Minimalists a cut of the action.

Cool, right?

Understandably, affiliate marketing is deeply intertwined with social media marketing, content marketing, and influencer marketing. This is because most affiliate links are promoted in content or on social media by influencers.

To learn more, check out, How to Start Affiliate Marketing with the Best Affiliate Programs.

6. Email Marketing

Email marketing is the process of using email to send direct marketing messages to people in an effort to gain new customers and retain existing ones.

Although email marketing might not seem like the most glamorous form of internet marketing, don’t underestimate its raw power.

Why?

Email marketing has a median return on investment of 122 percent – over four times higher than other types of internet marketing like social media and paid search.

Okay, so how does email marketing work?

Well, before you can begin email marketing, you’ve got to get your hands on some email addresses!

For this reason, email marketing nearly always works in partnership with other types of internet marketing like social media marketing and content marketing. In fact, just look to the right-hand side of this page, you’ll see a box inviting you to subscribe to our newsletter.

Email marketing campaigns will often start with something called a “lead magnet” – which is just a fancy way of saying “bait.”

The bait is usually a discount coupon or a particularly desirable piece of content, such as an ebook.

Shwood offers visitors a 10% discount off their first purchase if they sign up:

Lead Magnet Offer

Now, this is when the fun starts.

After capturing email addresses, you can begin to nurture your email subscribers with useful content, giveaways, discounts, early access to new products, and more.

You can also boost sales using email segmentation.

This is when you create separate groups of subscribers (called “segments”) based on their personal preferences and what stage each subscriber is at in the buyer’s journey.

Then, you can create automated email campaigns for each segment, that:

  • Welcome new subscribers
  • Follow up abandoned carts
  • Follow up with new customers to land repeat sales
  • Ask happy customers for a review
  • Re-engage inactive subscribers
  • Gather valuable feedback from existing customers
  • And more!

To learn more, check out, 6 Vital Email Templates Every Online Business Should Steal.

7. Paid Advertising

Paid advertising is a form of internet marketing where advertisers pay to show their adverts on search engines and other online platforms, such as Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn, and Instagram.

Now, paid advertising is often referred to as “pay-per-click” or “PPC” – this means that advertisers will pay a fee each time a user clicks on one of their ads.

But there’s more to paid advertising than PPC.

Many platforms now charge advertisers in different ways depending on their marketing objectives, such as:

  1. Cost-per-thousand-impressions (also known as “cost-per-mille” or “CPM”). This means you’ll be charged each time your ad is viewed 1,000 times.
  2. Cost-per-view (CPV). This means you’ll be charged for each view your video receives.
  3. Cost-per-action (CPA) (also know as cost-per-acquisition). This means you’ll be charged each time a user takes a specific action or converts into a customer.

The two biggest digital advertising platforms are Google and Facebook. Between them, they receive the majority of U.S. digital ad spend, with 38 percent and 19 percent, respectively.

Let’s take a quick look at each of them.

To advertise on Google, you must bid on the keyword terms you want to display your ads for.

For example, when using Google Adwords, you can bid to have your ad display for the keyword “standing desk.”

Keyword Data

Then, if you win the bid, whenever someone searches “standing desk” on Google they’ll see your advertisement in the search results.

Search Engine Marketing

Paid advertising on search engines like Google is often referred to as “search engine marketing,” or “SEM.”

One of the key benefits to SEM is that searchers usually have a high level of buyer intent. Think about it, if someone searches “standing desk,” it’s highly likely their interested in buying one!

Facebook allows you to display your ads to a refined target audience.

You can define your target audience by demographics, interests, behaviors, and more. Plus, there are numerous ways to apply different filters.

Facebook Ad Targeting

You can drill down to define your perfect customers, and then use Facebook ads to reach them.

There’s also something called “re-targeting” (also known as remarketing).

Have you ever been followed around the web by adverts? If you’re like most people, you check out a new pair of shoes, and then everywhere you go online you see adverts promoting those shoes.

This is stalking retargeting in action:

Retargeting Ads

Online advertising options also have extremely advanced tracking features. After placing an ad, you can track every view, like, comment, click, and conversion it receives.

To learn more, check out, The Beginner’s Guide to Boosting Sales With Google Shopping Ads.

Summary

More and more people are spending larger chunks of their day online, and all you need to reach them is an internet connection and a smartphone or laptop.

Because, unlike most traditional advertising, many forms of internet marketing – such as social media marketing, content marketing, or SEO – can be done for free.

It doesn’t even need to cost anything to learn internet marketing, with countless resources available online for free.

Remember there are seven types of internet marketing:

  1. Social media marketing
  2. Influencer marketing
  3. Affiliate marketing
  4. Email marketing
  5. Content marketing
  6. Search engine optimization (SEO)
  7. Paid advertising (PPC, SEM, etc.)

Plus, each type of internet marketing usually works best when used alongside others.

Which type of internet marketing do you want to start using? Why? Let us know in the comments below!

Want to Learn More?

Want to Diversify Your Marketing? Here Are 7 Alternatives to Facebook

Listen to your Grandma: Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket.

Sure, your Gran probably wasn’t talking about Facebook marketing, but her wisdom holds true.

For some time now, the cost of advertising on Facebook has increased while impressions have gone down.

Facebook Advertising Costs

Relying too much on one form of customer acquisition is dicey for any business. You’re bound to get caught with your pants down at some point.

Plus, you’re missing out.

People don’t just use Facebook. In fact, the average internet user has an average of 7.6 social media accounts!

There are also tons of other advantages to diversifying your advertising channels, such as cross-channel retargeting.

Bottom line, diversity brings security and advantages.

In this article, you’ll get an overview of seven channels that are great alternatives to Facebook.

Let’s dive in.

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Facebook Alternative #1: Google Ads

Google Ads is one of the best alternatives to marketing on Facebook.

In fact, Google is the only digital advertising channel that receives more U.S. digital ad spend than Facebook.

This is unsurprising when you consider that Google processes more than 4.5 billion search queries each day – that’s over 70,000 search queries every second.

You can use Google Ads to advertise on their Search Network and/or their Display Network.

Advertising on Google’s Search Network is when you bid to place your ads on Google’s search engine results page, or “SERP.”

Here’s an example from footwear company Vivobarefoot:

Google Ads

Next, advertising on Google’s Display Network lets you place ads on websites which use Google AdSense:

Google Network Ads

There are numerous benefits to using Google Ads, such as:

  • Advanced targeting
  • Budget control
  • Highly measurable
  • Fast results
  • Remarketing tools

Google Ads is based on a pay-per-click auction system.

In essence, advertisers bid on keywords, and the highest bid wins the advertising opportunity. Then, advertisers pay Google each time someone clicks on one of their ads.

To get started, check out our guide: Google Adwords Tutorial: A Step-by-Step Guide to Your First Campaign.

Facebook Alternative #2: Instagram

Instagram may be owned by Facebook, but it’s a different beast entirely.

Instagram has experienced massive growth in recent years and now has more than one billion monthly active users.

Plus, more than half of Instagram’s users visit the platform at least once per day, making it a brilliant alternative to Facebook.

So much so, that many advertisers are shifting ad dollars from Facebook to Instagram.

In fact, performance marketing agency Merkle recently reported that ad spend on Instagram was growing at four times the rate of ad spend on Facebook.

Specifically, year on year during Q2, Instagram’s ad spend went up 177 percent compared to Facebook’s 40 percent increase.

And there’s more.

This advertising channel is ideal for businesses outside of the U.S. or those looking to expand internationally, as 80% of the platform’s user base lives outside of the U.S.

Unsurprisingly, most of Instagram’s users are Millennials. In fact, 31% of Instagram users are 18 to 24 years old, and 30% are 25 to 34.

You can run five different types of Instagram ads:

  1. Photo ads
  2. Video ads
  3. Carousel ads
  4. Slideshow ads
  5. Stories ads

AirBNB Instagram Ads

It’s also easy to get started with Instagram ads if you’re currently advertising with Facebook. This is because Instagram ads are managed through Facebook’s ad manager.

To learn more, check out: Instagram Ads: How to Successfully Sell Your Products.

Facebook Alternative #3: YouTube

YouTube now has nearly 1.8 billion monthly active users.

It’s Google’s most popular service, with viewers watching more than 1 billion hours of video each day.

Here’s the crazy part…

YouTube on mobile alone reaches more 18-49 year-olds than any cable network in the U.S.

This advertising channel is well worth exploring, especially as video content is expected to claim 80 percent of all web traffic by 2019.

And according to “The State of Video Marketing in 2018,” 81 percent of people are convinced to buy a product or service by watching a brand’s video. Plus, 76 percent of businesses say video helped them increase sales.

When it comes to marketing, YouTube is a suitable alternative (or addition) to Facebook, with advanced targeting, remarketing capabilities, and plenty of other features.

There are six types of YouTube ads you can use:

  1. TrueView ads
  2. Non-skippable instream ads
  3. Bumper instream ads
  4. Sponsored card ads
  5. Overlay ads
  6. Display ads

These various advertising formats allow you to get extremely creative with your messaging and content.

For example, check out how Nike showcases their brand personality in this six-second bumper video ad:

YouTube also allows you to set your video campaign objective from one of the following:

  • Leads
  • Website traffic
  • Product and brand consideration
  • Brand awareness and reach

YouTube Ad Types

To get started, check out: YouTube Ads for Beginners: How to Launch Your First Campaign.

Facebook Alternative #4: Twitter

Although Twitter’s growth has plateaued in recent years, the platform is still a social media titan with more than 335 million monthly active users.

Furthermore, 42 percent of Twitter users access the app every day to send hundreds of millions of tweets.

Although Facebook towers over Twitter when it comes to the number of users, a massive 24 percent of U.S. adults still use this platform.

But that’s not all.

According to a report from Twitter and Research Now, 93 percent of people who follow small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) on Twitter plan to purchase from the SMBs they follow.

The site is particularly useful if your target audience is Millennials. The chart below shows Twitter users by age:

Twitter Users by Age

And these aren’t your average Millennials, either.

Twitter says that 80 percent of its users are “affluent Millennials.” So, as a platform full of Millennials with disposable cash, Twitter is definitely a viable alternative to Facebook.

There are two ways to advertise on Twitter.

You can use Twitter’s Promote Mode, or jump into full-blown Twitter ads:

Twitter Advertising

Promote Mode is easier to use and allows you to promote your tweets and account. (Unfortunately, this advertising feature is only available in the U.S., UK, and Japan.)

Twitter ad campaigns are far more customizable.

To start, you choose a campaign objective and then target your desired audience by factors such as location, gender, age, behaviors, and who they follow.

Twitter Ads

Twitter charges advertisers in different ways, depending on the campaign objective.

For example, if you’re trying to increase your website traffic, you use a pay-per-click system and pay each time someone clicks on your ad. However, if you’re promoting a video, you pay each time a user views it.

To get started on Twitter, check out: The Ultimate Guide to Using Twitter for Business Success in 2018

Facebook Alternative #5: LinkedIn

With more than 562 million users, LinkedIn is the leading social channel for business-to-business (B2B) marketers – in fact, 92 percent of B2B marketers prefer to use the platform over all others.

That’s huge.

However, it’s easy to understand when you consider the fact that 80 percent of B2B marketing leads from social media come through LinkedIn.

LinkedIn B2B Marketing

There are two ways to advertise on LinkedIn: Self-serve ads and/or Partner Solutions:

  1. Self-serve ads allow you to create and publish your own advertisements through the LinkedIn Campaign Manager.
  2. LinkedIn Partner Solutions is a way for larger businesses to talk with an expert at LinkedIn and access premium display advertising options.

Both are effective marketing alternatives to Facebook.

For smaller enterprises and those just starting a business, LinkedIn emphasizes how cost-effective self-serve ads can be – starting from as little as $10 per day.

There are three types of self-serve LinkedIn ads to choose from:

  1. Sponsored content
  2. Text ads
  3. Sponsored InMail

Let’s take a quick look at each of these types of LinkedIn ads.

Sponsored Content ads are shown in user’s feeds:

LinkedIn ads

Text Ads are shown in the sidebar of users’ feeds and LinkedIn messenger.

LinkedIn Display Ads

Sponsored InMail lets you send messages – which look the same as regular InMail – directly to users’ LinkedIn inboxes.

These three types of self-serve ads allow you to target users across devices by factors such as age, gender, location, school, job function, title, or company.

To get started, check out: The Beginner’s Guide to LinkedIn Ads: How to Setup Your First Campaign.

Facebook Alternative #6: Snapchat

Although it’s the sixth most popular social media platform in the world, Snapchat is probably the least understood mainstream social media network.

When content doesn’t last longer than one day and there’s no traditional feed to scroll through, many businesses just don’t “get it.”

So what is Snapchat?

Simply put, it’s part multimedia messaging app and part social network.

Users “chat” with friends by sending them short video clips, animations, and photos called “Snaps” – just think of it like texting, but with photos and videos.

The social networking aspect is Snapchat Stories – the platform’s pioneering format which has since been copied adopted by Facebook and Instagram.

Still, Snapchat’s unique features have made it the realm of youth.

In fact, there are more than 188 million daily active Snapchat users around the world, and a massive 71 percent of them are under 34 years old.

Additionally, about 71 percent of students say they use Snapchat more than six times per day, and 51% note that they are on Snapchat more than 11 times per day.

Bottom line: If you’re marketing to Generation Z or Millennials, there’s probably no better place to reach them than Snapchat.

There are three Snapchat ad products you can use to promote your business:

  • Filters: Your own branded filter.
  • Lenses: Your own branded lens.
  • Snap Ads: Full-screen video ads.

Snapchat Ads

There are also four main customizable attachments that you can add to your Snap ads.

You can drive traffic to your website, increase app installations, drive views for long-form video content, or drive Snapchatters to your augmented reality experience.

Snapchat Ads

Like most other social media advertising channels, Snapchat also lets you choose your objective.

This is based on the stage of the buyer’s journey your target audience is in: awareness, consideration, or conversions.

To learn more, check out: How to Use Snapchat for Business: The Complete Guide for 2018.

Facebook Alternative #7: Pinterest

With more than 200 million monthly active users globally, Pinterest is another effective alternative to Facebook.

Pinterest Marketing

Our friends at Shopify partnered with Pinterest to discover how the platform drives online commerce.

They found that 93 percent of users were using Pinterest to plan their purchases and that the average order value of sales coming from Pinterest is $50 – higher than any other major social platform.

Furthermore, 78 percent of Pinterest users actually welcome content from brands on the platform, and 66 percent buy something after seeing a brand’s pin.

Pinterest Ads

There are three ad formats to choose from:

  1. Promoted Pins
  2. Video Pins
  3. Promoted App Pins

Plus, Pinterest has five different campaign types:

  1. Traffic campaign: Send people directly to your website and pay per click.
  2. Awareness campaign: Get your business in front of people unaware of your brand and pay per 1,000 impressions.
  3. Video awareness campaign: Similar to a regular awareness campaign, but using Promoted Video Pins.
  4. Engagement campaign: Encourage Pinners to interact with your content and pay per engagement action.
  5. App install campaign: Get more installs for your app and pay by install or by click.

To get started, check out: How to Nail Pinterest Marketing & Pinterest Ads.

Bonus Facebook Alternative: Influencer Marketing

What exactly is an influencer?

Well, an influencer is anyone with a relatively large online following, including:

  • Mainstream celebrities like Terry Crews.
  • Niche celebrities such as crossfit games champion Jason Khalipa.
  • Industry experts such as digital marketing expert Rand Fishkin.
  • Micro-influencers (who typically have between 5,000 and 50,000 followers) such as yoga teacher Amber Lee Sears

Influencer marketing is when businesses pay, collaborate, or partner with an influencer to promote their product or service to the influencer’s following.

Before the rise of the internet, influencer marketing was only available to large brands with budgets big enough to satisfy rockstars and film stars.

Today, things are different.

In the last few years, influencer marketing has become an extremely popular and effective marketing strategy for businesses of all sizes.

Influencer Marketing

What’s more, micro-influencers actually perform better than big-name celebrities.

A survey conducted by Collective Bias found that only three percent of consumers are influenced by celebrity endorsements in their purchase decisions, while 30 percent of consumers are likely to buy a product recommended by a non-celebrity blogger.

It works too.

Karolis Rimkus began building his successful dropshipping store through influencer marketing: “At first I did a lot of influencer outreach. I would offer micro influencers, people with like 8,000 followers, an item they could make a giveaway with, or just send them a few free items in exchange for mentions. It worked, and I was growing and making sales.”

To learn more, check out our guide: How to Do Instagram Influencer Marketing.

Summary

There’s a world of digital advertising opportunity that extends far beyond Facebook.

These eight advertising channels are fantastic Facebook advertising alternatives that you can use to diversify your risk and gain new advantages.

Here’s a quick round-up of each advertising channel:

  • Google Ads: By far the largest digital advertising channel in the U.S., Google Ads has some of the most advanced targeting and tracking capabilities available.
  • Instagram: The quickest way to diversify your advertising channels if you already use Facebook advertising, as Instagram uses the Facebook ads manager.
  • YouTube: It’s the world’s largest video sharing platform and benefits from Google’s advanced advertising features. Perfect for capitalizing on the increase in video consumption.
  • Twitter: A platform with many affluent Millennials. Start by simply promoting your posts, or dive in with full-blown ads.
  • LinkedIn: The leading social channel for business-to-business marketers. LinkedIn provides three ad types and plenty of targeting options.
  • Snapchat: Dominated by younger people, Snapchat is the perfect opportunity for those targeting generation Z.
  • Pinterest: Pinners produce higher average order values than other major social channels. Plus, they actually like content from brands.
  • Influencer marketing: Extremely powerful when done right, and available to businesses of all sizes.

Which advertising channels are you currently using and why? Let us know in the comments below!

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